Melbourne Hand Surgery 

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Latest news: We request that you wear a mask when you attend our practice in person, and that you log your attendance via our Victorian Government QR code, by entering location code 3D7RE3 into the Services Victoria App or by writing your details on the physical register at our reception. Elective hospital surgeries are now unrestricted and you no longer need to have a COVID test prior to hospital admission. Dr Tomlinson is operating at The Avenue and Glenferrie Private; Epworth Cliveden is indefinitely closed at this time. 

All suitable consultations at Melbourne Hand Surgery are currently conducted via telehealth at our dedicated virtual clinic to maximise patient and staff safety. We have implemented enhanced hygiene measures in our rooms including acrylic screens, masks, hand sanitiser, face shields and physical distancing-related changes. We require that all patients provide a referral prior to booking an appointment so that we can identify and manage urgent and emergency conditions in a timely manner, and so that our surgeons can assess your suitability for a telehealth appointment and identify any further information or tests that might be required before your consultation.

Cellulitis

What is cellulitis?

Cellulitis is a bacterial infection of the skin and the underlying connective tissue. It is most commonly due to bacteria that are commonly found on the skin, like Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. It can be the result of cracked skin, cuts, bites, blisters, burns, surgery, injections or any other break in the skin.

What are the symptoms?

Cellulitis is associated with skin redness, throbbing pain, skin sensitivity, swelling and increased warmth of the affected skin. The redness increases in area as the cellulitis worsens, and often travels up the forearm and arm. There may be discomfort in the lymph nodes in the armpit and you may have fevers and shakes, and feel generally unwell.

Risk factors

Cellulitis is more likely to occur and be troublesome in individuals who have diabetes, lymphoedema or immune compromise.

Treatment

Treating cellulitis of the hand and forearm involves a combination of

  • elevation
  • antibiotics
  • splinting
  • pain relief
  • rest
  • +/- surgical cleaning of the entry wound or any blistered skin or devitalised tissue
  • identifying the bacterial source of the infection through swabs, blood cultures and/or tissue culture

If cellulitis is not responding promptly to treatment it is advisable to see a surgeon. Cellulitis can progress to become serious and it can also mimic a variety of other infective conditions that require surgery, such as abscess formation, necrotising fasciitis, septic arthritis or flexor tenosynovitis.

FRACS

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