Melbourne Hand Surgery 

Coronavirus update: We will be closed on Wednesday 8 April, but will reopen at 8:30am on Thursday 9 April. 

Melbourne Hand Surgery has mechanisms to protect our patients and staff while we continue to provide healthcare services. All consultations are now conducted via telehealth (phone or videoconference), except where we have previously confirmed the requirement for an in-person physical examination or wound care management.  Only emergency surgery is being conducted in hospitals for the foreseeable future, in keeping with Government directives. 

Due to the change in circumstances we will be closed on Fridays until further notice. If our practice is unable to physically open for business at any point in the coming weeks or months we will communicate this to existing scheduled patients via email and SMS (please do not attempt to reply other than with Y or N to an SMS, as the automated system does not facilitate this). Incoming telephone calls and receipt of voicemail messages may be temporarily affected by such a change. We will use this website banner to update you on changes to our practice and the availability of non-urgent procedures and surgery in the weeks and months ahead. Thank you for your understanding as our entire community works through these unprecedented and rapidly evolving times together (last updated: 4 April 2020).

Avocados: a hidden health hazard

Persea americana 2Avocados are delicious; I eat them regularly. But I also regularly perform surgery on people who have sustained an "avocado injury" - when they accidentally plunge a sharp knife into their hand while trying to remove the pit from the avocado. Even actress Meryl Streep sustained an "avocado injury" in 2012.

Sometimes no significant structures are injured, but sometimes the knife cuts a nerve, an artery and/or a tendon. It is possible to have a partial injury to a tendon and still be able to move the hand normally, but there is a significant risk that a partially injured tendon may completely rupture, so review by a hand surgeon is recommended.

The most dangerous way to remove the pit from an avocado is to stab the end of the knife at the pit - because the knife can glance off the side and plunge straight into your hand.

The safest way to remove the pit from an avocado is with a spoon. The YouTube video below shows a safe method with a knife - from a mother who explains that she has adjusted her technique after she cut herself and had to have stitches. Another relatively safe technique using a knife is demonstrated in photos at this website.

FRACS

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